Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which the body’s ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired, then resulting in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates and elevated levels of glucose in the blood and urine.

It has the ability to cause heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations, very serious complications. A lot of the food we eat is turned into sugar, or glucose, that our bodies then use for energy. An organ that is located near the stomach called the pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should use it, that more than likely means you have the disease.  This is what causes sugar to start building up in the blood. Diabetes commonness continues to grow due to increased obesity – which can lead to metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes leading to higher incidences of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes often goes undiagnosed; it has many symptoms but is predicted by a main simple set of symptoms:

  • Increased hunger
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased need to urinate

Complications can be prevented or significantly prolonged by maintaining good control over your diabetes, cholesterol and blood pressure.   There are two types of diabetes, type 1 which is insulin dependent and type 2 which is non-insulin dependent. Type 1 typically generates in children and young adults, it destroys the pancreatic cells which means insulin production is not possible. Type 2  is the more common one and is controlled by diet and exercise. It generally affects people over the age of 45, and also over weight. People who have type 2 are unable to produce enough insulin causing the sugar to build up in the bloodstream.

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